Looking for an elevator pitch for coaches? Here’s what you need to keep in mind to create yours.

Elevator pitches are not just for people who go on Shark Tank. As a coach or holistic business owner, you need one, too.

The best elevator pitches clearly, concisely describe what you do and how you help your clients.

And they’re not just for use at networking events! You can use your elevator pitch or what-I-do statement anytime you’re introducing yourself: on your website, your social media, consults, webinars, or in person.

Why coaches need an elevator pitch

If you’re a coach, you’ve probably realized — the market is getting pretty crowded. You need to do whatever you can to stand out among a sea of other life, health, and career coaches.

That’s where a solid elevator pitch comes in. The right pitch, targeted toward the right people, can help you stand out, build your brand, and attract your coaching clients.

Without a solid elevator pitch, you’ll struggle to talk about what you do and what makes you different, leaving people confused or worse — leaving opportunities on the table.

3 tips to create a stellar elevator pitch for coaches

The best elevator pitches sound natural, easy to understand, and are written specifically to attract your coaching niche.

Following these 3 tips can help you create the best elevator pitch for your coaching business:

Tip 1: Be yourself. 

Even though this is a “pitch,” it needs to sound like something created by you, even if you use a template.

Your elevator pitch should sound like your voice, include a touch of your personality, and include words that you normally use.

You should feel comfortable and natural while speaking your elevator pitch. (Ok, maybe not at first, but after some practice!)

Tip 2: Be specific.

If your coaching elevator pitch just tells me you’re a “coach,” I want to know more. What kind of coach are you? Who do you work with? What kinds of things do you coach?

In order to be specific, you need to know your ideal clients pain points and desires. Most importantly, you should be able to speak to the value you provide for your clients.

If you aren’t clear on your ideal clients’ pain points and desires, you need to start with a bit of market research. (You can do that here.)

Tip 3. Keep it client-centric.

It’s a common misconception that your elevator pitch should be all about you. The main point of your elevator pitch is to describe what you do in a way that resonates with your ideal clients.

There’s a saying in marketing: When you confuse, you lose. You don’t want people to lose interest this early in the game, so make sure your pitch is as clear as possible.

When creating your elevator pitch, make sure you run it by a few ideal clients and get their specific feedback. Ensure that it’s clear, easy to understand, and compelling.

What not to include in your elevator pitch for coaches

Make sure you stay away from the following when creating your elevator pitch:

  • Avoid having too many“I”s in your elevator pitch. Remember, your pitch is for your audience, not for you.
  • Avoid coaching terms and industry jargon. Do your prospective clients understand what a “limiting belief” is? If not, don’t include it in your elevator pitch.
  • Avoid including a list of your credentials. There is a time and place for that (like on your About page!), but leave it out of your elevator pitch.
  • Avoid describing the detailed process of “how” you coach. (This type of messaging can be important when a prospective client is further along the buying journey; but an elevator pitch is specifically for those people who are NEW to you.)

Consider these two examples of an elevator pitch for a coach:

Which do you find more compelling?

“I’m a life coach for women.” 

vs.

“I’m a life coach for women going through a midlife career transition who are struggling to find the right direction. Working together, my clients get guidance and support to explore  opportunities, so they can find clarity and make the best decision for them.”

Now, if you’re a woman going through a midlife career transition, you’re going to resonate more with the second statement, right?

That’s why it’s so important to write your elevator pitch with your ideal clients in mind.

Looking to create an elevator pitch for your coaching business? 

You’re in luck! I developed a free template for creating an elevator pitch for coaches and you can find it here.